Spring Alliums

This time of year there are bushels of green alliums in the garden, and I don’t know of anything as healthy and tasty. Don’t think of them as a seasoning. They are a vegetable, and should be eaten in satisfying quantities.
One proviso: this applies to fresh green alliums from your garden. The leeks that you buy at the store have tough leaves and aren’t suited for this treatment.

My urban homestead

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One of the many reasons that I love green garlic and green alliums generally is that they are among the earliest things to come out of the garden, assuming that you planted in early fall. I have plenty of summer veggies in my freezer, but as the days start to lengthen I get ravenously keen for the first real, fresh greens, and by mid-February I’m eating out of the garden again.

For early green alliums, plant some in a block that you can cover with Agribon or other frost blanket material. I like to put a short row of my regular yellow storage onions in this block in September, and each will divide and make four or five superbly sweet green onions in early spring.

Garlic is another must, and my favorite for early green garlic is Chinese Pink, because it is super-early and is eight inches tall and half…

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